Pomodoro Technique – Why Is This Technique So Effective For Studying and Productivity

(Last Updated On: August 3, 2022)

Many people are not good at studying for long periods of time.

They often get distracted and end up doing something else with the time, like watching Netflix or YouTube videos.

We all know this as procrastination – the habit of delaying a task until the last minute.

Procrastination is a widespread problem that plagues many people.

It is the desire to avoid or postpone doing something when it can be done well with less effort, in order to free up time for other things. It takes up our time and makes it hard to achieve our goals.

Thankfully, there is a powerful and effective technique that can help you with studying and helps you improve your productivity.

And in today’s article, I’ll share a method to optimize productivity and time management while minimizing burnout.

It is called the Pomodoro technique and it allows you to beat procrastination and improve your focus.

What Is Pomodoro Technique?

The Pomodoro technique was developed by a university student named Francesco Cirillo in the 1980s. Francesco found a way to increase his productivity by using a tomato-shaped kitchen tool, and now his technique is now used by millions all over the world.

This simple method is dividing a huge task into small uninterrupted segments, with a short break, to make sure you’re getting the most out of your time.

It is one of the simplest productivity techniques because all you need is a timer.

How to Get Started With Pomodoro Technique

Here’s how you can get started with Pomodoro.

At first, you need to choose a task that you want to accomplish. In the next step, take your timer and set the timer to 25 minutes. Throughout these 25 minutes, you will be working non-stop on your task.

When the time is up, you will take a 5-minute break. And after your break, you restart the timer and resume your task.

And don’t forget the last step. Every 4 Pomodoro, you take a longer 15 or 30 minutes break.

How to Add Pomodoro to Your Routine

What is Pomodoro Technique

While this sounds like a simple productivity method, let’s break every one of the steps that I mentioned a moment ago.

When choosing a task you want to accomplish, make sure you’re only working on it. Throw away any distractions like your phone, social media, or movies.

There is no time in one Pomodoro for checking your emails, Twitter, or WhatsApp messages. It is a real distraction and those small interruptions add up.

You have to focus only on one thing because multitasking will actually lower your productivity.

The Pomodoro technique helps you resist all of those self-interruptions and train your brain to focus.

Each Pomodoro session is dedicated to one task and each break is a chance to reset and bring your attention back to what you should be working on.

So, if you are ready, it is time to set your timer to 25 minutes. As a timer, it’s clever to use your smartphone or smartwatch, but be aware of the distraction they can give you.

You should also know these 25 minutes are not absolute. You can use 20 minutes or 30 minutes, even longer if you want. It’s all about personal preference and I highly recommend experimenting.

You need to find what works best for you.

As you already know, each session when you are working on your task is called one Pomodoro.

While the method is using a 5-minute short break after each session, it is contra-productive when you stop working on your task when the inspiration is flowing.

Many people are ignoring some of these 5-minute breaks and working without stopping.

However, if you choose a short break. After it ends, you need to reset your timer for a new session.

It is also important to know that after every 4 sessions, you have to take a longer break.

I highly recommend using this long break to clear your mind, to eat, or stretch.

Conclusion

Remember, the Pomodoro technique is meant to help you. This is not a system you have to follow as it is. You should customize it and find a sweet spot that works best for you.

Most people will find a sweet spot that’s anywhere from 20 to 50 minutes, with a 5 to 15-minute break depending on their needs.

Try mixing your intervals based on your available energy, your mood, and the type of work.

While it sounds like a simple technique, it takes time and practice to do it right.

Some individuals may have trouble adapting to the Pomodoro technique.

Still, as long as it is achieved correctly and tailored to your needs, you could see a significant boost in productivity and time management.

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